timberland uk online horse racer doesn’t let heart defect slow her down

timberland tackhead boots horse racer doesn’t let heart defect slow her down

Brown had regular echocardiograms to monitor the rate at which her valve was narrowing, but she had more plans. The spring after climbing Mount Rainier she went to Belize to scuba dive. Putting on her wetsuit left her “huffing and puffing,” as did attaching her tanks. Her aortic valve had calcified to a critical point. When she returned from her trip in 2016 and had another echocardiogram, her doctor was stern. “We’ve crossed a threshold,” he said. “If you do nothing, you don’t have two years.”

Brown had regular echocardiograms to monitor the rate at which her valve was narrowing, but she had more plans. The spring after climbing Mount Rainier she went to Belize to scuba dive. Putting on her wetsuit left her “huffing and puffing,” as did attaching her tanks. Her aortic valve had calcified to a critical point. When she returned from her trip in 2016 and had another echocardiogram, her doctor was stern. “We’ve crossed a threshold,” he said. “If you do nothing, you don’t have two years.”

Her decision worked for a woman in otherwise excellent shape. And her story, which she shared at a Heart Association fundraiser, underscored that heart care needs to be tailored to individual patients.

For their honeymoon 45 years ago, Brown and her husband, a horse veterinarian, climbed Mont Blanc, the highest mountain in the Alps. They own six horses and a mule, and take them on endurance races for up to 100 miles.

Brown didn’t want to let her heart problem keep her from living as she always had. So, a few years after her diagnosis, she arranged to climb Mount Rainier, the highest mountain in Washington, at 14,411 feet, with her husband.

“It was on my bucket list, from the first time I ever laid eyes on it I said ‘I’m going there,'” Brown said.

The climb takes several days and involves traveling over glaciers. Brown struggled to breathe more than usual, and she developed painful cramps in her legs from oxygen deprivation, but she made it to the summit. When she returned to Missoula and had another echocardiogram, Brown said her doctor told her, “I wish I had never let you go.”

To monitor the rate at which her valve was narrowing, Brown came in for regular echocardiograms, but she had more plans. The spring after climbing Mount Rainier, she went to Belize to scuba dive. Putting on her wetsuit left her “huffing and puffing,” as did attaching her tanks.

Brown had been a competitive swimmer in college and felt she could easily scuba dive, even with her worsening heart condition.

Her instructor was worried, but Brown was insistent. She was used to pushing through discomfort for the sake of adventure. Once underwater, her mask kept filling with water, making it hard to see, and requiring Brown to blow air into the mask to push the water out the top.

Continuously clearing her mask left Brown so out of breath that she had a panic attack during the dive.

When she returned from her trip in May 2016 and had another echocardiogram, her doctor was stern.

“We’ve crossed a threshold,” he said. “If you do nothing, you don’t have two years left.”

“I really have a lot to do this summer, I don’t have time!”

She’d lost enough summers to recovering from knee surgeries and other broken bones that came as a result of her active lifestyle. She likes to joke that she has “many frequent flyer miles at the hospital and at physical therapy.” She’s had both knees replaced, and a total of around 20 surgeries.

When she retired in 2014, Brown thought she’d finally be able to ski and ride her horses every day, and she never expected to have to worry about her heart.

But she took the doctor’s urgency seriously, and scheduled surgery for a few weeks later, in May 2016. Up until the actual surgery, Brown had mostly been upset about missing out on activities while recovering. But as she was wheeled into the operating room after eating dinner with her family, it hit her.

“I was happy, we ate early enough so I could have wine and a really good dinner. But when my husband and son left me and they wheeled me in I get teary thinking about it. You just realize, ‘Oh my golly.'”

Surgeons removed her calcified valve and replaced it with that of a cow. Within three days, she left the hospital and went home, a short amount of time for that kind of surgery.

The Kentucky Derby was taking place that weekend, and she didn’t want to watch it from the hospital, she said. Brown’s cat kept her company while she recovered, sleeping on her stomach.

“It was nice to have someone to talk to,” Brown said.

Brown wasn’t supposed to lift more than the weight of a soup can during that time, but she was restless. The next week, she went hiking with her hiking group.

Rehab for heart patients is not designed for people like her, whose bodies were healthy before the surgery, she said. Brown had to create her own rehab exercise routine, and now she’s trying to help other women in the same situation as her.

A year and a half later, Brown is fully recovered, but she learned several things from pushing her heart to near failure. On Friday, she spoke at the Go Red for Women American Heart Association fundraiser about her experience.

Brown is not the typical image of a person with heart disease, and American Heart Association wanted to highlight that. Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer of women, and it can affect otherwise healthy women like Brown. Brown’s message to those in attendance was, “listen to your bodies and take your heart health seriously, no matter how healthy you think you are.”
timberland uk online horse racer doesn't let heart defect slow her down